AUTO STEERING REPAIR

AUTO STEERING REPAIR

We offer complete auto steering repair service. Our skilled auto mechanics fix both rack-and-pinion and recirculating-ball steering systems.
We offer complete auto steering repair service. Our skilled auto mechanics fix both rack-and-pinion and recirculating-ball steering systems.

We offer complete auto steering repair service. There are two common types of steering systems: rack-and-pinion and recirculating-ball steering. We fix them all.

Understanding Auto Steering Systems

Rack and Pinion steering has become the most common on cars, small trucks and SUVs. A rack-and-pinion gear set is enclosed in a metal tube, with each end of the rack protruding from the tube. A rod, called a tie rod, connects to each end of the rack.

The pinion gear is attached to the steering shaft. When you turn the steering wheel, the gear spins, moving the rack. The tie rod at each end of the rack connects to the steering arm on the spindle.

Recirculating-ball steering is used on many trucks and SUVs. Recirculating-ball steering gear contains what’s called a worm gear. The steering wheel connects to a threaded rod, similar to a bolt, that sticks into the hole in the block. When the steering wheel turns, it turns the bolt. Instead of twisting further into the block the way a regular bolt would, this bolt is held fixed so that when it spins, it moves the block, which moves the gear that turns the wheels.

Common Auto Steering Repairs

Auto steering repairs often involve fixing the power steering pump or rotary valve.

The power steering pump is driven by the car's engine via a belt and pulley. It contains a set of retractable vanes that spin inside an oval chamber. As the vanes spin, they pull hydraulic fluid from the return line at low pressure and force it into the outlet at high pressure.

The rotary valve is the part the system that senses you turning the steering wheel and provides assistance to make that turn easy.  The key to the rotary valve is a torsion bar. The torsion bar is a thin rod of metal that twists when torque is applied to it. The top of the bar is connected to the steering wheel, and the bottom of the bar is connected to the pinion or worm gear, so the amount of torque in the torsion bar is equal to the amount of torque the driver is using to turn the wheels.